Category Archives: News

CONGRATULATIONS INSECTROPOLIS

Recently recognized as one of the 10 best insect zoos in the nation, Insectropolis, a bugseum at 1761 Route 9 in Toms River offers a great indoor environment to learn about insects and bugs from beetles to tarantulas. Whether static displays or the real thing, the insect zoo attracts Ocean County residents and visitors from a variety of places. The bugseum, opened from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday most of the year and with Mondays added in the summer months, offers a combination of fun and education for all ages. Ocean County Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari recently was provided a tour of the facility by owner Chris Koerner prior to presenting Koerner and staff members with a Certificate of Recognition from the Ocean County Board of Chosen Freeholders. In an article in USA Today Insectropolis takes its place in the top 10 among national museums and other insect zoos across the country. Pictured from left to right are: Gaby Pintauro, insect handler, Diane Redzinak, manager, Chris Koerner, director of operations, Freeholder Vicari, Valerie Redzinak, manager, and Mario Cunha, insect handler.

 

 

USDA Encourages the Use of Food Thermometers to be Food Safe this Summer

Summer is a time for family vacations, backyard barbeques and plenty of outdoor activities with food as the centerpiece. But before those steaks and burgers go on the grill, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) wants to remind consumers to keep their family and themselves safe from foodborne illness by using a food thermometer to ensure meat and poultry is cooked to the correct internal temperature.
Continue reading USDA Encourages the Use of Food Thermometers to be Food Safe this Summer

50th Annual Commencement Ceremony at Ocean County College

One thousand four hundred and ninety-nine (1,499)* students are candidates for associate degrees at Ocean County College’s 50th Annual Commencement Ceremony on Thursday, May 25 at 6:00 p.m., held on OCC’s Main Campus, College Drive, Toms River, NJ.  Following the ceremony, OCC will host a cookie reception on the College Mall for graduates, friends, and family.

Continue reading 50th Annual Commencement Ceremony at Ocean County College

OPENING DAY – OCEAN COUNTY WELCOMES FARMERS MARKET

From herbs to freshly picked strawberries and vegetables, to a selection of wines, bakery goods, and flowering plants to pierogis and creative spice blends, just to name a few, are all featured at the Downtown Toms River Farmers’ Market which has a new location. Still located in Downtown Toms River, the market has moved to the Ocean County Parking Garage Lawn along Hadley Avenue between Washington Street and Madison Avenue.  Ocean County Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari and Freeholder Virginia E. Haines welcomed the market at its opening on May 24 cutting a ceremonial ribbon with Alizar N. Zorojew, Executive Director of Downtown Toms River, and Noelle Latano, Executive Director, Greater Toms River Chamber of Commerce. The market runs every Wednesday from May 24th to Nov. 15th from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (May through October) and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesdays in November. There will be a special Thanksgiving market on Monday, Nov. 20 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.  The public is encouraged to come out and enjoy Jersey Fresh and support your local New Jersey vendors. Continue reading OPENING DAY – OCEAN COUNTY WELCOMES FARMERS MARKET

OUTSTANDING STUDENTS HONORED AT OCC AWARDS CEREMONY

Ocean County College presented 51 awards, totaling more than $63,650 to 77 outstanding students at its 50th Annual Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, May 24, at 7:00 p.m. in the Jay and Linda Grunin Center for the Arts, on the Ocean County College Main Campus, College Drive, Toms River, NJ.

The Awards Ceremony will be re-broadcast on Ocean TV 20 via Comcast of Toms River and Long Beach Island Channel 20 and Verizon FiOS of Northern Ocean County Channel 24 on Thursday,May 25 at 8:00 p.m.; Saturday, May 27 at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday, May 28 at 3:00 p.m.; and Monday, May 29 at 4:00 p.m. The ceremony will also be broadcast on the College’s website, www.ocean.edu, with video remaining available for online viewing for several weeks. Continue reading OUTSTANDING STUDENTS HONORED AT OCC AWARDS CEREMONY

O.C.E.A.N. INC. RECOGNIZED DURING COMMUNITY ACTION MONTH

Noting its many programs and services assisting Ocean County’s low-income families, the anti-poverty agency, O.C.E.A.N. Inc., recently was recognized by the Ocean County Board of Chosen Freeholders during National Community Action Month.

National Community Action Month was created by the Community Action Partnership to reinforce the importance of agencies who help low-income families achieve economic stability. Continue reading O.C.E.A.N. INC. RECOGNIZED DURING COMMUNITY ACTION MONTH

USE CAUTION WHEN APPLYING FERTILIZERS AND PESTICIDES

SPRING’S MANY RAINY days have been great for lawns and gardens, but many homeowners will take an extra step in search of that elusive deep green lawn free from weeds and insects.

However, the improper use of fertilizer and pesticides can threaten nearby waterways and the Barnegat Bay, warned Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari.

“I caution everyone to please carefully read the instructions before applying any chemicals or fertilizers to lawns and gardens,” Vicari said. “The overuse of fertilizers is one of the leading causes of high nitrogen levels in the bay.”

If too much fertilizer is applied, the excess can wash off in the rain and flow into storm drains that empty into nearby streams, rivers and the bay.

“The State of New Jersey has some of the toughest laws in the nation regarding the levels of nitrogen in store-bought fertilizer,” Vicari said. “Even so, if these products are applied incorrectly they can pose a serious threat to our waters.”

All fertilizer products for turf sold in the state must contain at least 20 percent slow-release nitrogen, and zero phosphorus – unless a soil test demonstrates a need for more.

Vicari said consumers can check the first and second number on the package for nitrogen and phosphate content. For example, a Formula of 26-0-3 means no phosphate.

Vicari also warned about the dangers of pesticides commonly available at local home and garden stores.

“Read the directions before you apply any pesticide. Used incorrectly, these toxic chemicals can not only threaten the environment, but can pose a health hazard to children and pets,” he said.

It is equally important to store fertilizers and pesticides properly when not in use.

“Store these chemicals on a high shelf away from children and animals.” Vicari said.

In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, officials learned another good reason to keep chemicals on high shelves.

“We had many damaged homes, garages and sheds where the flood waters washed all kinds of household chemicals into the bay,” said Freeholder Deputy Director Gerry P. Little. “In many cases, if these materials had been placed higher off the floor there would not have been a problem.”

Little, who is liaison to both the Ocean County Health Department, said a little caution can go a long way.

“If you have pesticides and other household chemicals in your home, be sure to keep the number for the New Jersey Poison Information System close by. The poison emergency number is 1-800-222-1222.”

Residents with old or excess pesticides on hand can also safety dispose of them through the county’s Household Hazardous Waste Program.

More information is available on the county’s website www.co.ocean.nj.us under the Department of Solid Waste.

OCEAN COUNTY MAN PRESENTED MEDAL ALMOST 40 YEARS AFTER HEROIC ACTION

Robert Cartwright dedicated a great deal of his life to military service. From 1951 to 1954 he served in the U.S. Marine Corp spending a year in Korea.

Six years after his 1954 discharge, he joined the reserve of the U.S. Marine Corp and was stationed at Naval Airfield Willow Grove, Pa. in charge of the crash crew. He retired in 1999 settling in Lakewood with his wife Rae. Continue reading OCEAN COUNTY MAN PRESENTED MEDAL ALMOST 40 YEARS AFTER HEROIC ACTION

Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset Announces Top Baby Names of 2016

The Social Security Administration recently released the list for top baby names in the country for 2016 and for the fourth year in a row, Liam ranks as number one for the most popular boy’s name and for the third year in a row, Emma ranks as number one for the most popular name for girls. In New Jersey, Noah is ranked as the second most popular boy’s name and Emma is ranked as the third most popular girl’s name, with Liam and Mia earning the top spots. At Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset’s recently renovated state-of-the-art maternity unit, Jacob and Isabella took the coveted number one spots.   Continue reading Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Somerset Announces Top Baby Names of 2016

The Patcong Creek Foundation’s Patcong Creek Clean-Up Effort Removes More Than Two Tons of Debris

More than 65 volunteers descended on Patcong Creek in Somers Point, NJ on May 21 for the third annual Assault on Patcong Creek Clean-Up effort.

The Patcong Creek Foundation launched this environmental initiative to encouraging the community to help keep regional waterways and crabbing spots clean. The ACUA, Linwood Environmental Commission and the Somers Point Green Team have partnered with the Patcong Creek Foundation since 2015 in the annual Patcong Creek Clean Up effort. Participants worked together to clean up debris from the marshes around the creek, and generously use their boats to transport larger debris back to the mainland for proper disposal. Area officials including Somers Point Mayor Jack Glasser, Atlantic County Sheriff Frank Balles, Atlantic County Freeholders Maureen Kern and John Carman, and Somers Point City Councilmen Sean McGuigan and James Toto, also helped to remove and properly dispose of more than two tons of debris found in the marshes. Continue reading The Patcong Creek Foundation’s Patcong Creek Clean-Up Effort Removes More Than Two Tons of Debris